S4-18.5 – Allied Health Professionals and Patient Identification in Endocrinology Clinics

S4-18.5 - Allied Health Professionals and Patient Identification in Endocrinology Clinics
Cyrielle Caussy and the Surfers explore final thoughts on identifying NAFLD/NASH patients earlier on in endocrinology settings and the role of allied health professionals in making this possible. Finally, each panelist is asked what they would do if they had a magic wand to touch one thing in their hospital to make a change.

As part of our ongoing dialogue around clinical care pathways and the complex of metabolic diseases, SurfingNASH dedicates a session to focus on the key relationship and interplay between endocrinology and hepatology.

This topic rings familiar in the Rising Tide series, our podcast for frontline education, where Ken Cusi often notes the need for endocrinologists to become comfortable diagnosing Fatty Liver disease (and prescribing pioglitazone) and for hepatologists to become more comfortable prescribing GLP-1s. To expand on these critical ideas with the SurfingNASH community, Jörn Schattenberg, Louise Campbell and Roger Green are joined by Cyrielle Caussy, Professor of Nutrition and Endocrinologist-Diabetologist at Lyon 1 University and Lyon South Hospital, Hospices Civils de Lyon (France). Cyrielle is an expert in the clinical care of metabolic disease, including type 2 diabetes, obesity and NAFLD, and she is leading a clinical and research program focused on metabolic liver disease at the Lyon Hepatology Institute.

This conversation begins with Jörn concurring with Cyrielle’s statement about the importance of regular interaction and communication. Roger also agrees before asking Jörn for what he considers to be key in getting liver patients picked up earlier by endocrinologists, primary care or even gastroenterologists. Jörn replies that this specific health system pathway will matter, but the role of nurse practitioners will be the key. He also emphasizes the importance of offering better information to patients. Finally, he says we need to stress that there are things physicians can do with these patients and this will become easier to discuss once drugs have been approved. Louise notes that this aligns with her focus on the role of allied health providers. She goes on to comment on the value of VCTE in identifying disease in all kinds of different patients. Jörn adds that at least once a week he is asked to consult on a patient whose unrelated surgery led to a decompensating cirrhotic event. As the session winds down, Roger asks the panelists what they would do if they had a magic wand to touch one thing in their hospital to make a change. Listen on to hear their varying and surprising answers.

If you enjoy the episode, have questions or interest around endocrinology and Fatty Liver disease, we kindly ask that you submit reviews wherever you download the discourse. Alternatively, you can write to us directly at questions@SurfingNASH.com.

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Sponsoring partnerships with SurfingMASH present a multifaceted avenue for companies seeking to amplify their brand presence and engage with targeted audiences.